Methodology



The unique aspect of the Design Laboratory project approach is flexibility. The core model respects principles, models and guidelines established in Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF) practice. Design Laboratory seeks to accommodate each client’s work environment and culture; being fiercely wedded to a particular methodology brings challenges of its own. Every Design Laboratory project opens with conversation about the desired endgame: results and outcomes. The team clarifies the business goals and tactical reach of the change management exercise underway, including whether it will touch software, data management, hardware, security infrastructure, employee workflow, and instructional design. A typical project track has the five highlights below.

Project Track Highlights

Team Formation
A custom lineup of relevant skill is assembled from the world-class Design Laboratory consultant roster, representing a diverse panorama of experience, certifications, and personalities.
Due Diligence
In the discovery phase, the project team connects with client-side subjet matter experts and validates the data it captures with key stakeholders. A "current state document" is created before any change is initiated. A project governance model is established so all participants are connected and accountable.
Scope Definition
The team clarifies the business goals and tactical reach of the change management exercise underway, including whether it will touch software, data management, hardware, security infrastrucutre, employee workflow or instructional design.
Impact Ramifications
The team forecasts the effect of the project throughout the client organization, defining risks and forming preemptive mitigation strategies.
Deployment
Design Laboratory teams go the distance and beyond to ensure their solutions work not only on paper, but in practice. An extended project framework can feature a continuous improvement loop for capturing ranking and implementing further changes.